Staining Interior Woodwork

Friday, December 03, 2010

If your house as wood walls or a number of pieces of wooden furniture, considering re-staining to breathe new life into your home.

Interiors don’t have to contend with the elements, so interior stains last longer than exteriors.  And while it would seem to many homeowners that interior woodwork—such as doors or cabinets—might not absorb a lot of stress or damage, this is not necessarily the case.  We cause nicks, scratches and other dings on the woodwork through constant and even occasional usage.  Also, air conditioning and heating systems can cause stress on the wood.

Be sure to have someone inspect the wood to determine if it is an antique or modern piece or pieces of wood.  Some homeowners are resourceful enough to determine the quality of the wood themselves, but it never hurts to have a professional take a look.  And once you’ve determined that the wood is in good shape and ready for staining, here are a few things to think about.

As a homeowner, you might not be happy with your current stain and would like to try a different one.  Explore the various options for stains (and varnishes, if you like), but be sure to find stains with low or no-VOC’s.  VOC stands for volatile organic compounds, which are solvents found in finishes and paints, which can give off toxic fumes.  A professional painter will have you covered in this regard, but it never hurts to know what you’re applying in your home.

Be sure to smooth the wood surface with sandpaper and apply the stain (whether by brush or rag) evenly, then wipe off any excess stain with something like paper towel or another rag.  Let the the first coat dry and then apply a second to ensure a nice and even look to the woodwork.

Proper ventilation is a must as well as proper disposal of the stain and rags as they are combustible.

If you have any questions on which types of stains to use for your home, please give Lakeside Painting a call at 262.642.9445 or email us at info@lakesidepainting.com

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