Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting

Friday, April 16, 2021


Lakeside Painting has been deeply committed to employee and jobsite safety throughout its 40+ years of business. That's why we have a monthly, company-wide safety meeting. This includes both a residential worker safety program and another for our commercial/industrial services.

While ladders are easily one of the most useful pieces of equipment for paint professionals, they also demand respect, constant awareness, and proper technique. In our most recent safety meeting, Lakeside discussed and demonstrated safe and proper ladder usage.

Ladder Falls: Common Causes & Injuries

When ladder falls happen, it's almost always because people aren't following proper safety practices. Infrequent or even non-existent safe ladder training is often to blame.

For instance, standing on top of a ladder is a understood as incredibly unsafe, and yet some people continue to do it. Similarly unsafe actions include climbing ladders with materials in hand, leaning left to right or backward, and even attempting to move the ladder while standing on it.

Falls can also happen when there is a failure to inspect the ladder for broken or loose components, or even non-approved fixes. Selecting the same ladder for every job and situation can also cause a fall.

Lakeside Painting's Safe Ladder Practices

Twice annually Lakeside Painting holds a company-wide safety meeting on proper ladder usage and technique. We do this so that our customers can rest easy that our team will work safely on their project.

In the photo slideshow below you can see images from Lakeside's safe ladder work meeting. And below is a recap on our training.

Ladder Safety & Technique

  • Inspect all ladders before using
  • Notify management of broken ladders that need replacing or that can be fixed
  • Use the correct ladders for the job (for example, don't use a short ladder for a high wall)
  • Check the weight rating to avoid overloading the ladder
  • Safely store ladders inside work vehicles, or securely tie them to the roof rack
  • Set up ladder on firm ground and, when necessary, have co-worker hold the ladder for added stability
  • If possible, tie off ladder to the structure
  • Climb and descend ladder with three points of contact: two feet and at least one hand
  • Do not stand on ladder's top step
  • Use a tool belt to carry tools up the ladder, or have a co-worker hand them to you
  • Climb down to reposition ladder instead of leaning or reaching
  • Safely load the ladder into the work vehicle or tie it to the roof rack
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting
Ladder Safety Training at Lakeside Painting

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